What is Eye Relief on Binoculars? Everything You Need to Know

Last updated on December 24th, 2022 at 12:31 pm

Eye relief is the distance from your eye to the eyepiece lens of the binocular. To see the entire field of view, it is essential to have adequate eye relief on binoculars, especially if you wear glasses. When your eyes are not close enough to the eyepiece, then you won’t be able to see the whole image. How much eye relief you need depends on the quality of your vision and the size of the binoculars you are using. 

Most binoculars have between 10 and 20mm of eye relief on binoculars, which is generally adequate for most people. If you suffer from low vision and have glasses, you might require more extended eye relief binoculars. Some binoculars come with adjustable eye relief, which means you can tailor the fit to your eyes. 

When shopping binoculars for hunting, try them out with your glasses to ensure you can see the entire field of view. Our experts can help you select the ideal pair of binoculars if you’re unsure what size or the kind you require.

What is Binocular Eye Relief?

Binocular eye relief refers to distances between the eyes and binocular lenses. This is necessary for two reasons: First, you need to be able to see through both lenses simultaneously.

The minimum eye relief on binoculars is around 2.5 inches (6.35 cm), but binoculars with more extended eye relief are available. If you wear glasses, you’ll need to adjust in the thickness of your lenses when choosing binoculars.

What is Binocular Eye Relief?

Binocular eye relief is significant if you wear glasses. This is because you need to see through both lenses simultaneously, and the thickness of your glasses lenses will affect the distance between your eyes and the binocular lenses. 

The minimum binocular eye relief is around 2.5 inches (6.35 cm), but binoculars with more extended eye relief are available. If you wear glasses, you’ll need to factor in the thickness of your lenses when choosing binoculars.

Problems May Be Due To Eye Relief

Eye Relief is typically not a problem for users of binoculars unless they are wearing glasses. If your eyes are deeply set, it can also be an issue. Your glasses block the ability to get your eyes closest to your lens. It is possible. If you’re wearing glasses, you’re at an advantage because glasses can prevent you from reaching your eyecups to be closed.

This two problems may be due to eye relief:

  1. Field of View Reduction
  2. More light from the peripheral

4 Types of Eye Relief in Binoculars

1) Short Eye Relief in Binoculars

Any eye relief less than 13mm is considered short eye relief. Short eye relief is more of a characteristic on hunting scopes than something that birdwatchers expressly look for. Using binoculars with short eye relief is only advised for individuals who do not wear glasses.

When purchasing binoculars, you should consider eye relief if you wear spectacles. Then you must refrain from picking any model with a limited eye relief specification. This is because even the thinnest of glasses will require eye relief of more than 13mm. ultimately, a portion of your field of view will always be lost.

2) Long Eye Relief Binoculars

Any eye relief length over 20mm is considered long eye relief. Long eye relief binoculars are specially designed to provide a clear image for those who wear glasses. The vast area between the eyepiece and the lens allows people wearing glasses to see the entire visual field without taking their glasses off.

Long Eye Relief Binoculars

These binoculars are also great for birdwatching, enabling you to see birds in flight without worrying about them getting too close to your face. Long eye relief binoculars are an optical instrument designed to provide the user with a clear, magnified view of distant objects while maintaining a comfortable viewing position.

This is accomplished by providing a long distance between the eyepieces and the lenses, allowing the user to keep their eyes further away. This results in a more relaxed viewing experience and helps to prevent eye fatigue. Long eye relief binoculars are ideal for bird watching, stargazing, and other applications where it is essential to have a clear view of distant objects.

3)20mm Eye Relief Binoculars

If you’re looking for binoculars with a bit more leeway in eye relief, 20mm eye relief binoculars may be a good option. These binoculars typically have longer eyepieces that allow you to position your eyes further away from the lenses. This can be especially beneficial if you wear glasses or have sensitive eyes.

20mm Eye Relief Binoculars

Eye relief on binoculars is the distance between the eye and the eyepiece lens. It is essential for eye comfort, as it determines how close the watch can be to the eyepiece lens while still seeing the entire field of view. People who wear glasses benefit from more extended eye relief on binoculars to see the whole area of view without trying to press their lenses against the lens system.

4) Binoculars 16mm Eye Relief

Eye relief is one of the specs you’ll see listed when shopping for binoculars. For binoculars 16mm in size, the eye relief tends to be around 16mm. It is relatively long compared to other binocular measures, making them a good choice for those who wear glasses or sunglasses. Remember that longer eye relief binoculars will be heavier and bulkier, so it’s a trade-off between weight and comfort of use. Ultimately, it’s up to you to decide what’s more important to you.

Binoculars 16mm Eye Relief
How to Set Eye Relief on Binoculars?

When adjusting your binoculars’ eye relief, there are some factors to consider.
First, make sure that you are comfortable looking through the lenses. If you have to strain your eyes to see through them, the eye relief is not set correctly. 
Second, check to see if the vision is bright and clear. You will need to modify the eye relief if it is unclear.
Finally, ensure you can see the area around the object you are trying to view. You must extend the eye relief if part of the image is obscured.

How to Adjust the Eye Relief?

Bring the binoculars to your eyes.
Slowly move them away from your face until you can see the entire image.
Mark the spot once you’ve discovered it to make it simple to return to it. You may need to adjust the eye relief periodically, depending on the distance of the object you are trying to view.

What is Eye Relief Distance?

Eye relief distance measures the space between the eye and the eyepiece lens. It is essential for eye comfort, as it determines how close the watch can be to the eyepiece lens while still seeing the entire field of view.

What is Eye Relief Distance

More extended eye relief on binoculars is preferable for those who use glasses since it lets them know a lot of thought without pressing their spectacles against the eyepiece lens. 20mm eye relief binoculars are an excellent option for those needing more space between their eyes and the lenses.

What are Eye Relief Glasses?

If you wear glasses and have difficulty seeing the entire field of view in your binoculars, try a pair of eye relief glasses. These glasses have an eye cup that fits over your eyeglasses, allowing you to see the entire field of view without pressing your drinks against the eyepiece lens. 

You can find eye relief glasses at most sporting goods stores. Try them on before you buy to ensure they fit comfortably and do not interfere with your binoculars’ focus.

When purchasing binoculars, you should be aware of the eye relief feature. Especially if your eyes are deep set or if you wear spectacles. Finding a pair of binoculars with the proper eye relief on binoculars can determine whether you get a decent view or miss out on many scenes.
You must be able to select a nice set of binoculars with enough eye relief to get a fantastic view of the birds by utilizing the advice in this post. If you use glasses, please tell me which binoculars I should get or which one I should stay away from in the comments section below.

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